Advocacy Resources

Vermont Family Network Advocacy Resources

Vermont Advocacy Resources

  • Disability Law Project represents Vermonters with disabilities in a wide range of civil legal problems related to their disability and provides counsel and advice, brief service, and full representation to eligible clients and their family members.They also engages in public policy advocacy to protect and expand the rights of Vermonters with disabilities.
  • Disability Rights Vermont  provides information, referral and advocacy services, including legal representation when appropriate, to individuals with disabilities throughout Vermont. DRVT also advocates to promote positive systemic responses to issues affecting people with disabilities.
  • Green Mountain Self-Advocates (GMSA) is a Vermont self-advocacy organization run by people with developmental disabilities. Groups meet to listen to each other, make new friends, learn about their rights, and tell politicians and others why people with disabilities are important.
  • National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI -Vermont) supports, educates and advocates so that all communities, families, and individuals affected by mental illness can build better lives.
  • Vermont Center for Independent Living (VCIL)  empowers Vermonters with disabilities, deaf Vermonters, and others to tear down the physical, communication, and attitudinal barriers.
  • Vermont Coalition for Disability Rights (VCDR) is a cross-disability advocacy organization that seeks to increase awareness of disability issues and effect systemic change through legislative and administrative processes. VCDR staff work closely with member organizations to empower people with disabilities, thus enabling them to directly participate in legislative decisions which will expand their civil rights.
  • Vermont Developmental Disabilities Council (VTDDC) is a state-wide board that serves as an independent advocate and works to increase public awareness about critical issues affecting people with developmental disabilities and their families. It brings the voice of people with developmental disabilities and their families to the policy making process, and they make up 60% of its members. Throughout the year, VTDDC provides information and alerts about what is happening before agencies and at the legislature.
  • Vermont Early Childhood Alliance
  • Voices for Vermont’s Children
  • Get on Board and Make a Difference! (GMSA and ARC)
  • Creating New Partnerships-Including Self-Advocates in Training A flyer offering suggestions to help ensure self-advocates get the necessary supports in preparing for and providing presentations.
  • Voter’s Guide for People with Disabilities (Vermont Center for Disability Rights)
  • Voter Accessibility and Equal Access to Voting: It’s the Law (Office of the Vermont Secretary of State)

National Advocacy Resources

 

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